What is Nanotechnology?

Nanotechnology is the study of matter on the nanoscale, from 1 to 100 nm, and this has become important as materials exhibit many new characteristics that are significantly different from their bulk properties. These nanomaterials come in many different shapes and forms such as spheres, wires, or rods, and these influence the electronic and physical characteristics of the nanomaterial. While scientists have been working with naturally occurring and synthetic nanomaterials for many years, the progress of nanotechnology and its applications have skyrocketed once scientists could better characterize the physical characteristics and correlate them with the newly observed properties.

Real World Applications

While it may seem like it only has a place in the laboratory, nanotechnology has many commerically viable applications. The greater surface area to volume leads to an enhanced chemical reactivity, and nanostructured materials are being tested and used for filtration and purification or enhanced sensitivity sensors. Reducing the size can create new electrical properties, as evidenced by all of the work in 2-d materials like graphene, and this is extremely useful in semiconductor and electronics applications as companies seek to manufacture smaller and smaller devices. Beyond just smaller electrical components, these new electrical properties show great potential for energy collection and storage applications, i.e. photovoltaic solar cells and batteries. Depending on the material, very strong tuneable optical properties can be created as well, leading to new light emitting diode (LED/OLED) technologies for both display and lighting.

Nanotechnology and CRAIC

As CRAIC Technologies specializes in optical tools for spectroscopic characterization from the ultraviolet to the short-wave infrared with microscale sampling areas, there are a multitude of applications in nanotechnology for our microspectrophotometers (MSP) and Raman microspectrometers. This is especially true as they can both be used on the same microscope to quickly and easily collect Transmission, Reflection, or Photoluminescence microspectra from the same area as Raman microspectra!

While not an exhaustive list, here are some highlights of peer-reviewed research being conducted with our instruments.

To learn more about microspectroscopy and nanotechnology applications, please reach out to us by phone or email!

Scale of things
Chart of the "Scale of Things" produced by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences for the U.S. Department of Energy.

20/30 PV Microspectrophotometer with Apollo II Raman microspectrometer

20/30 PV microspectrophotometer with Apollo II Raman microspectrometer!

What is a MSP?

Science of  MSP's

MSP Design

MSP Applications

20/30 PV™ MSP

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Bionanotechnology Research Instrumentation

Bionanotechnology development with a microspectrophotometer

Microspectrophotometers are used to analyze bionanotechnology products by reflectance, absorbance and fluorescence


 

Protein crystal analysis with a microspectrophotometer

Microspectra of protein crystals

 

 

Bionanotechnology applies the principles of nanotechnology to biotechnology: where the technological products and organisms are derived from biology and agricultural sciences.  Products resulting from bionanotechnology research are used in three major areas: agriculture, biologically derived products such as biofuels and environmental applications.  As such, bionanotechnology ranges from microarrays where thousands or millions of tests can be conducted on a single device simultaneously, bioengineering and bioremediation. 

Due to the microscopic volumes of the materials to be analyzed, microspectrophotometers are the perfect tool.  Able to analyze micro-scale volumes by absorption, reflectance or even fluorescence, these tools are easy-to-use and very accurate.  Their flexibility and accuracy make them very importance for analyzing everything from genetically engineered bacteria to sophisticated microarrays. 

To learn more about microspectroscopy and bionanotechnology applications, select one of the following links: 

What is a Microspectrophotometer?

Science of Microspectrophotometers

Microspectrophotometer Design

Uses of Microspectrophotometers

20/30 PV™ Microspectrophotometers

 UV-visible-NIR microscopes, UV-visible-NIR microspectrometers and Raman microspectrometers are general purpose laboratory instruments. They have not been cleared or approved by the European IVD Directive, the United States Food and Drug Administration or any other agency for diagnostic, clinical or other medical use.

 

Bioengineering Research Instrumentation

Bioengineering development with a microspectrophotometer

Microspectrophotometers are used to analyze bioengineering products by reflectance, absorbance and fluorescence


 

Protein crystal analysis with a microspectrophotometer

Microspectra of protein crystals

 

 

Bioengineering is used to produce technological products and organisms from the fields of biology and agricultural sciences.  Products resulting from biotechnology research are used in three major areas: agriculture, biofuels and environmental applications.  As such, bioengineering ranges from microarrays where thousands or millions of tests can be conducted on a single device simultaneously, biotechnology and bioremediation. 

Due to the microscopic scale of the materials to be analyzed, microspectrophotometers are the perfect tool.  Able to analyze micro-scale volumes by absorption, reflectance or even fluorescence, these tools are easy-to-use and very accurate.  Their flexibility and accuracy make them very important for analyzing everything from genetically engineered organisms to sophisticated microarrays. 

To learn more about microspectroscopy and bioengineering applications, select one of the following links: 

 

What is a Microspectrophotometer?

Science of Microspectrophotometers

Microspectrophotometer Design

Uses of Microspectrophotometers

20/30 PV™ Microspectrophotometers

 UV-visible-NIR microscopes, UV-visible-NIR microspectrometers and Raman microspectrometers are general purpose laboratory instruments. They have not been cleared or approved by the European IVD Directive, the United States Food and Drug Administration or any other agency for diagnostic, clinical or other medical use.

 

Near Infrared Microscope

Near infrared microscope

The near infrared microscope is a microscope that images in the near infrared region. 

Near infrared microscopes are designed to "see" beyond what a standard optical microscope can image.  With special near infrared optics, light sources and cameras, near infrared microscopes can image microscopic samples in the visible and the shortwave infrared region.  This means that near infrared microscopes have features that make them superior to normal visible range microscopes:

  • Some materials are transparent in the near infrared while being opaque in the visible region
  • Enhanced contrast of certain materials in the near infrared region. 

For example, silicon is opaque under normal light but is transparent in the near infrared region.  The interiors of silicon based devices can therefore be inspected without having to disassemble them.    

CRAIC Technologies offers a number of solutions for the near infrared microscope.  These custom designed microscopes capable of imaging from the visible region all the way into the near infrared.  They are capable of microscopy in transmission, reflectance and even fluorescence.

Learn more about near infrared microscopes:

Near Infrared Microscope Design

Uses of the Near Infrared Microscope

UVM-1™ Near Infrared Microscope

 
 
The lit microscope base is a trademark of CRAIC Technologies, Inc.
 

 

 

Near IR microscope

The Near IR Microscope is a microscope that images in the near infrared region. 

Near IR microscopes are designed to "see" beyond what a standard optical microscope can image.  With premium near IR optics, light sources and cameras, near IR microscopes can image microscopic samples in the visible and the shortwave IR region.  This means that near IR microscopes have features that make them superior to normal visible range microscopes:

  • Some materials are transparent in the near IR while being opaque in the visible region
  • Enhanced contrast of certain materials in the near IR region. 

For example, silicon is opaque under normal light but is transparent in the near IR region.  The interior of silicon based devices can therefore be inspected without having to disassemble them.    

CRAIC Technologies offers a number of solutions for the near IR microscope.  These custom designed microscopes capable of imaging from the visible region all the way into the near IR.  They are capable of microscopy in transmission, reflectance and even fluorescence.

Learn more about near IR microscopes:

Near IR Microscope Design

Uses of the Near IR Microscope

UVM-1™ Near IR Microscope

 
 
The lit microscope base is a trademark of CRAIC Technologies, Inc.