Spectroscopy with a Microscope

Microscope Spectrometer

 

 

Micro spectroscopy data

Emission Spectra Measured with a Microscope Spectrophotometer

 

 

Microscope spectroscopy is the measurement of UV-vsibile-NIR spectra of microscopic samples.

Microscope spectroscopy uses instruments designed to measure UV-visible-NIR spectra of microscopic samples or microscopic areas of larger objects.  There are two basic types: the fully integrated microspectrophotometer (as shown) that has been built and optimized for microspectrophotometry.  There is also the spectrophotometer unit designed to attach to an open photoport of an optical microscope.   Each has its strengths and depending upon the configuration, both are capable of measuring the spectra of microscopic samples by transmission, absorbance, reflectance, fluorescence, emission and polarization spectroscopy.   With special software, both are capable of thin film thickness measurements and colorimetry as well.

A CRAIC Technologies™ microscope spectrophotometer is a purpose-built system that allows UV-visible-NIR range micro spectroscopy both non-destructively and with no sample contact.  Capable of analyzing even sub-micron areas, they are also capable of high resolution digital imaging.  Designed for ease-of-use, they are durable instruments designed for microscale spectroscopy.

Contact CRAIC Today!

To learn more about microscope spectrophotometers, select a link:

What is a Microscope Spectrophotometer?

Science of Microspectroscopy

Microscope Spectrophotometer Design

Uses of Microscope Spectrophotometers

508 PV™ Microscope Spectrophotometers

20/30 PV™ Microspectrophotometer

CRAIC Apollo™ Raman Microspectrometer

 

We invite you to discover our revolutionary technologies that include a range of microscope spectrometers, microspectrometers, UV-visible-NIR microscopes, Raman microspectrometers, Traceable Standards, micro spectrometry accessories and software. We further invite you to experience our exceptional service and technical support.

 

 

Learn about the uses of Spectrometry with a Microscope

Microscope Spectrometer

 

 

Micro spectrometry data

Emission Spectra Measured with a Microscope Spectrometer

 

 

 

Microscope Spectrometry is the measurement of UV-vsibile-NIR spectra of microscopic samples.

Microscope Spectrometry uses instruments designed to measure UV-visible-NIR spectra of microscopic samples or microscopic areas of larger objects.  There are two basic types: the fully integrated microspectrometer (as shown) that has been built and optimized for microspectrometry.  There is also the spectrometer unit designed to attach to an open photoport of an optical microscope.   Each has its strengths and depending upon the configuration, both are capable of measuring the spectra of microscopic samples by transmission, absorbance, reflectance, fluorescence, emission and polarization spectrometry.   With special software, both are capable of 3D surface mapping measurements and colorimetry as well.

A CRAIC Technologies™ microscope spectrometer is a purpose-built system that allows UV-visible-NIR range micro spectrometry both non-destructively and with no sample contact.  Capable of analyzing even sub-micron areas, they are also capable of high resolution digital imaging.  Designed for ease-of-use, they are durable instruments designed for microscale spectroscopy.

 

 

Contact CRAIC Today!

 

 

To learn more about microscope spectrometers, select a link:

What is a Microscope Spectrometer?

Science of Micro Spectrometry

Microscope Spectrometer Design

Uses of Microscope Spectrometers

508 PV™ Microscope Spectrometers

20/30 PV™ Microspectrometer

CRAIC Apollo™ Raman Microspectrometer

  

 

We invite you to discover our revolutionary technologies that include a range of microscope spectrometers, microspectrometers, UV-visible-NIR microscopes, Raman microspectrometers, Traceable Standards, micro spectrometry accessories and software. We further invite you to experience our exceptional service and technical support.

 

 

Relative Intensity Measurements of Displays

Microdisplay

Figure 1: Microspectrometers are used to measure the intensity of each pixel


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Microdisplays

Figure 2: Typical test spectra from a display. Intensities can be directly compared between pixels.

 

 

The luminance, intensities or brightness of individual pixels and groups of pixels can be measured and compared using microspectrometers.

Flat panel displays consist of a series of colored lighted areas arranged in a pattern and can only be readily viewed with magnifying optics.  Due to the high resolution of flat panel displays, they are manufactured with hundreds of rows of microscopic "pixels" on a surface.  Generally, these pixels are red, blue and green though pixels with other colors are also made...for example the latest four color systems also incorporate yellow pixels.

One aspect of display quality control consists of making sure that the brightness or intensity of each pixel does not vary across the entire display.  For example, all the green pixels should have the same brightness no matter where they are positioned in the display. 

Microspectrometers are able to gather relative intensity data from single pixels and from groups of pixels (if you are interested in mura).  Additionally, microspectrometers are also able to map the relative intensity variation within even a single pixel!  This leads to a new level of precision for improved displays.

The way a microspectrometer works is that spectrophotometer entrance aperture is placed over the pixel or pixels in questions.  The black square in Figure 1 is an example.  The spectra is then acquired and will look something like the three spectra in Figure 2.  Using the LambdaFire™ software, the intensity data is compared with measurements of other pixels to show that the brightness of each sampled area is within the manufacturing parameters.  A high resolution map of the relative intensities can then be generated.

Learn more about relative intensity measurements of displays below: 

What is a Microspectrometer?

Science of Microspectrometers


 

Microdisplay Inspection

Microdisplay

 


 

Microdisplays

Typical test spectra from a microdisplay

 

 

Microdisplay Inspection: Color, relative intensity, spectroscopy and film thickness of pixels and light sources.

Microdisplays consist of a series of colored lighted areas arranged in a pattern and can only be readily viewed with magnifying optics.  They are used as high resolution displays for everything from mobile phones to video display headgear to MP3 players.  There are many different designs but their small scale causes many quality control challenges. 

Due to the nature of microdisplays, they are manufactured with hundreds of rows of microscopic "pixels" on a surface.  These pixels can be smaller than 10 microns across.  Quality control of both the components and completed microdisplays is done by optical microspectroscopy.  Microspectrometers, such as those made by CRAIC Technologies, are used to measure the color and the intensity of the output from individual pixels and from groups of pixels.  In fact, CRAIC microspectrometers can be used to map the color and intensity outputs of individual pixels in addition to the entire microdisplay.  This is important as manufacturers of microdisplays need to make sure that all the different types of pixels are the same color and brightness.  A microspectrophotometer does this quickly and easily. 

To learn more about microdisplay testing:

What is a Microspectrophotometer?

Science of Microspectrophotometers

Colorimetry of Pixels and Displays

Relative Intensity Measurements

508 PV™ Spectrophotometers for Microscopes and Probe Stations

 

Shortwave IR Microscope

Shortwave IR microscope

The Shortwave IR Microscope is a microscope that images in the shortwave IR region. 

Shortwave IR microscopes are designed to "see" beyond what a standard optical microscope can image.  With special shortwave IR optics, light sources and cameras, shortwave IR microscopes can image microscopic samples in the visible and the shortwave infrared region.  This means that shortwave IR microscopes have features that make them superior to normal visible range microscopes:

  • Some materials are transparent in the shortwave IR while being opaque in the visible region
  • Enhanced contrast of certain materials in the shortwave IR region. 

For example, silicon is opaque under normal light but is transparent in the shortwave IR region.  The interiors of silicon based devices can therefore be inspected without having to disassemble them.    

CRAIC Technologies offers a number of solutions for the shortwave infrared microscope.  These custom designed microscopes capable of imaging from the visible region all the way into the shortwave infrared.  They are capable of microscopy in transmission, reflectance and even fluorescence.

Learn more about shortwave IR microscopes:

Shortwave IR Microscope Design

Uses of the Shortwave IR Microscope

UVM-1™ Shortwave IR Microscope

 
 
The lit microscope base is a trademark of CRAIC Technologies, Inc.