UV Microscope

UV Microscope

The UV Microscope is a microscope that can image in the ultraviolet region. 

UV microscopes are designed to "see" beyond what a standard optical microscope can image.  With special UV optics, light sources and cameras, UV microscopes can image microscopic samples in the visible and the UV region.  This means that UV microscopes have features that make them superior to normal visible range microscopes:

  • Some materials are transparent or clear in normal microscopes but can be imaged with UV microscopes
  • By using the shorter wavelengths of UV light, higher image resolution can be obtained than with the longer wavelengths of visible range light.

One example is in imaging protein crystals: these microscopic crystals are transparent in the visible range but can be easily seen at 280 nm due to the strong absorbance of certain amino acids.  

CRAIC Technologies offers a number of solutions for the UV microscope.  These custom designed microscopes capable of imaging from the deep UV all the way into the near IR.  They are capable of UV microscopy in transmission, reflectance and even fluorescence.

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Learn more about UV microscopes:

  UV Microscope Design

Uses of the UV Microscope

UVM-1™ UV Microscope

 
The lit microscope base is a trademark of CRAIC Technologies, Inc.
 UV-visible-NIR microscopes, UV-visible-NIR microspectrometers and Raman microspectrometers are general purpose laboratory instruments. They have not been cleared or approved by the European IVD Directive, the United States Food and Drug Administration or any other agency for diagnostic, clinical or other medical use.

 

Cytospectrometer

Cytospectrophotometer

 


 

Cytospectrophtometer

Emission Spectra Measured with a Microspectrophotometer

 

 

The Cytospectrometer measure the UV-vsibile-NIR spectra of sub-cellular components.

The Cytospectrometer is designed to measure UV-visible-NIR spectra of cellular components.  In other words, the cytospectrophotometer is a microspectrophotometer of which there are two basic types: the fully integrated microspectrophotometer that has been built and optimized for microspectroscopy and the spectrophotometer unit designed to attach to an open photoport of a biologicalal microscope.   Depending upon the configuration, both are capable of measuring the spectra of microscopic samples by transmission, absorbance, reflectance, fluorescence, emission and polarization microspectroscopy.   With special software, both are capable of surface spectral mapping measurements and colorimetry as well.

A CRAIC Technologies™ microspectrophotometer is a purpose-built system that allows you to analyze UV-visible-NIR range microspectra™ non-destructively and with no sample contact.  Capable of analyzing even sub-micron areas, they are also capable of high resolution digital imaging.  Designed for ease-of-use, they are durable instruments designed for microscale spectroscopy.

To learn more about microspectrophotometry and microspectrophotometers, select one of the following links: 

What is a Microspectrophotometer?

Science of Microspectrophotometry

Microspectrophotometer Design

Uses of Microspectrophotometers

20/30 PV™ Microspectrophotometer

508 PV™ Microscope Spectrophotometers


  

We invite you to discover our revolutionary technologies that include a range of microscope spectrophotometers, microspectrophotometers, UV-visible-NIR microscopes, Raman microspectrometers, Traceable Standards, micro spectrophotometry accessories and software. We further invite you to experience our exceptional service and technical support.

 

 

 

 UV-visible-NIR microscopes, UV-visible-NIR microspectrometers and Raman microspectrometers are general purpose laboratory instruments. They have not been cleared or approved by the European IVD Directive, the United States Food and Drug Administration or any other agency for diagnostic, clinical or other medical use.

Luminescence

Luminescence is the decay from the excited state to the ground state

Luminescence is the emission of a photon with the decay of an electron from an excited state to the ground state.  Different decay paths describe different types of luminescence.  For example, fluorescence occurs with the decay from the singlet S1 to the S0 ground state directly and is generally on the nanosecond time scale.  Phosphorescence occurs when the decay is from a triplet state to the S0 ground state and generally takes much longer. 

The excitation to the excited state occurs by absorption of energy.  The most common energy source is a light source.  However, chemical reactions (chemiluminescence), electricity (electroluminescence) and more can all act as means to achieve the excited energy state.

Luminescence spectrometers are designed to collect and measure the emitted photons.  The microspectrometer can be configured as a luminescence spectrometer which is combined with a microscope.  They are designed to measure  luminescent spectra of microscopic samples or microscopic areas of larger objects.  There are two basic types: the fully integrated microspectrophotometer that has been built and optimized for luminescent microspectroscopy and the spectrophotometer unit designed to attach to an open photoport of an optical microscope.   The beauty of microspectrometers is that they can also be configured to measure the transmission and reflectance spectra of microscopic sample areas in addition to luminescence.  And with special software, they are capable of colorimetry as well.

A CRAIC Technologies™ microspectrometer is a purpose-built system that allows you to analyze UV-visible-NIR range luminescent emissions non-destructively and with no sample contact.  Capable of analyzing even sub-micron areas, they are also capable of high resolution digital imaging.  Designed for ease-of-use, they are durable instruments designed for microscale spectroscopy.

To learn more about microspectroscopy and microspectrometers, select one of the following links: 

What is a Microspectrometer?

Microspectrometer Design

Uses of Microspectrometers

20/30 PV™ Microspectrophotometers

Fluorescence
 

Fluorescence is the decay from S1 to S0 as shown in this Jablonski Diagram

Fluorescence is the emission of a photon with the decay from the S1 excited state to the S0 ground state.  Generally, fluorescent emissions occur approximately 10-9 to 10-7 seconds after excitation. Fluorescence spectrometers are designed to collect and measure the emitted photons.

The microfluorometer is a fluorescence spectrometer interfaced with a microscope.  They are designed to measure fluorescence spectra of microscopic samples or microscopic areas of larger objects.  There are two basic types: the fully integrated microfluorometer that has been built and optimized for fluorescence microspectroscopy and the fluorescence spectrometer unit designed to attach to an open photoport of an optical microscope. The beauty of microfluorometers is that they can also be configured to measure the transmission and reflectance spectra of microscopic sample areas in addition to fluorescence.  And with special software, they are capable of colorimetry as well.

A CRAIC Technologies™ microfluorometer is a purpose-built system that allows you to analyze UV-visible-NIR range fluorescent emissions non-destructively and with no sample contact.  Capable of analyzing even sub-micron areas, they are also capable of high resolution digital imaging.  Designed for ease-of-use, they are durable instruments designed for microscale spectroscopy.

To learn more about microspectroscopy and microfluorometers, select one of the following links: 

What is a Microfluorometer?

Microfluorometer Design

Uses of Microfluorometers

20/30 PV™ Microfluorometers

 

 

 

 

Fluid Inclusions

Fluid Inclusion

 
 
The lit octagonal optical head and the CRAIC CoalPro™ are trademarks of CRAIC Technologies, Inc.
 

Fluorescence Microspectroscopy can be used to analyze fluid inclusions.

Fluid Inclusions are microscopic pockets of gas or liquids trapped within minerals.  The contents of these pockets may contain information on the original physical and chemical conditions in which the source rock formed.  This information can be useful for many applications including mineralogical surveys and petroleum exploration.

CRAIC Technologies offers a number of solutions for the analysis of fluid inclusions.  These include purpose built systems such as the CRAIC CoalPro™ to the 308 Coal™ and 20/30 PV™ for advanced microscopic imaging and spectral analysis of petrographic samples.  These systems are capable of transmission, reflectance and fluorescence microspectroscopy and imaging of even sub-micron fluid inclusions.

To learn more about the science behind fluid inclusion analysis, select one of the following links: 

Science of Microspectroscopy

Microspectrophotometer Design

Uses of Microspectrophotometers

CRAIC CoalPro™ Measurement System

308 Coal™ Spectrophotometer for your Microscope