Spectral Pathology

Spectral Pathology with a microspectrophotometer

Spectral pathology research can be done with microspectrophotometers using reflectance, absorbance and fluorescence microspectroscopy and imaging.

spectroscopic pathology

UV image of a cell

Ultraviolet image of a cell

 

 

Spectral pathology can use microspectrophotometers to examine tissue on the microscopic scale.

Spectral pathology is the study of disease by examining the spectroscopic characteristics of tissues and bodily fluids.  Biomarkers are analyzed either directly in the tissue or fluid or with the aid of taggant molecules.  An example of the latter would be a fluorescent immunoassays of tissues.  Spectral pathology is being developed to aid the pathologist in identifying diseases in tissues and fluids by analyzing and comparing the spectra of the diseased versus the healthy samples.  It has been shown that some types of diseased tissue can be directly identified by their spectrum while others can be tagged and then located and identified.

Microspectrophotometers, such as the 20/30 PV™, are able to measure the UV-visible-NIR range spectrum of microscopic areas of tissue samples in absorbance, reflectance and even fluorescence.  Combined with automated stages, these systems could map out the spectral characteristics of tissue samples with very high spatial and spectral resolution.  Additionally, such microspectrophotometers are also able to directly image the biological samples from the deep UV to the NIR yielding even faster diagnostic techniques.

To learn more about microspectroscopy and applications such as spectral pathology, select one of the following links: 

What is a Microspectrophotometer?

Science of Microspectrophotometers

Microspectrophotometer Design

Uses of Microspectrophotometers

20/30 PV™ Microspectrophotometers

 UV-visible-NIR microscopes, UV-visible-NIR microspectrometers and Raman microspectrometers are general purpose laboratory instruments. They have not been cleared or approved by the European IVD Directive, the United States Food and Drug Administration or any other agency for diagnostic, clinical or other medical use.

 

Forensic Evidence Examination

Forensic Evidence Examination

Microspectrophotometers are used for forensic evidence examination to compare fibers, paints, soils, glass, plastic and questioned documents..

 

 

 

Forensic evidence is analyzed with a microspectrophotometer

UV-visible-NIR absorbance spectra of three single textile fibers.

 

Science of UV-visible-NIR Microspectrophotometers

Science of Raman Microspectrometers

Microspectrophotometer Design

Uses of Microspectrophotometers

Microspectrophotometers are used to examine microscopic amounts of forensic evidence.

Forensic evidence examination is the field of forensic science that relates to the examination of evidence.  One of the most common types is trace evidence: this field covers everything from textile fibers, glass and plastic fragments, paint chips and smears, soils and much more.  It is the job of the forensic scientist to determine if a known and a questioned sample are from the same source.  Another, but more difficult task, is to determine the source of an unknown sample.  Often tests are done by comparison with other original samples or by comparison with standard reference materials.

Many types of tests can be performed by the forensic scientist on forensic evidence.  Many of these tests are determined by the type of evidence that is being examined.  Due to the microscopic nature of most trace evidence, microspectrophotometers such as the 20/30 Forensic™ are commonly found in forensic laboratories.  This system is able to provide both images and spectra of microscopic features of any type of trace evidence in the ultraviolet, visible and near infrared regions.  The visible part of the spectrum is important as it helps distinguish between different colors found in trace evidence.  The UV is important as many of the colorants used also have a UV active component.  The NIR region is important as there may be important sample variations observed here.  A 20/30 PV™ will allow the forensic scientist to take both images and microspectra™ in UV, color and NIR.

Raman microspectroscopy is growing in its importance in the forensic lab.  It is able to identify materials and functional groups of much smaller samples than a standard FTIR microspectrometer.  The Apollo Raman Spectrometer™ is designed to add this capability to the microscope. 

Glass is another common type of trace evidence.  The rIQ™ system intelligently measures the refractive index of the small glass fragments.  When integrated with a microspectrophotometer, the color and fluorescence of the glass may also be measured.

To learn more about forensic evidence examination, select one of the following links: 

20/30 PV™ Microspectrophotometers

Glass Refractive Index Measurements

Apollo™ Raman Microspectrometer

Trace Evidence Examination

Forensic Evidence Examination

Microspectrophotometers are used for trace evidence examination to compare fibers, paints, soils, glass, plastic and questioned documents..

 

 

 

Forensic evidence is analyzed with a microspectrophotometer

UV-visible-NIR absorbance spectra of three single textile fibers.

 

 

Microspectrophotometers are used to examine microscopic amounts of trace evidence.

Trace evidence examination is the field of forensic science that relates to the examination of microscopic amounts of evidence.  This field covers everything from textile fibers, glass and plastic fragments, paint chips and smears, soils and much more.  One of the most common tasks of the forensic scientist is to determine if a known and a questioned sample are the same.  Another, but more difficult task, is to determine the source of an unknown sample.  Often tests are done by comparison with other original samples or by comparison with standard reference materials.

Many types of tests can be performed by the forensic scientist on trace evidence.  Many of these tests are determined by the type of evidence that is being examined.  Due to the microscopic nature of most trace evidence, microspectrophotometers such as the 20/30 PV™ are commonly found in forensic laboratories.  This system is able to provide both images and spectra of microscopic features of any type of trace evidence in the ultraviolet, visible and near infrared regions.  The visible part of the spectrum is important as it helps distinguish between different colors found in trace evidence.  The UV is important as many of the colorants used also have a UV active component.  The NIR region is important as there may be important sample variations observed here.  A 20/30 PV™ will allow the forensic scientist to take both images and microspectra™ in UV, color and NIR.

Learn more about forensic analysis:

What is a Microspectrophotometer?

Dyed hairs and Textile Fibers

Paint Evidence

Questioned Documents

Glass Refractive Index

UV-visible-NIR Microspectrophotometers

Raman Microspectrometers

Questioned Document  Examination

Questioned Document Examination

 

 

 

 

Questioned document examiner results with a microspectrophotometer

Microscopic reflectance spectrum of two black inks

 

 

Microspectrophotometers are used for non-destructive examination of inks and papers.

Questioned document examination is the field that relates to the forensic examination of documents, inks and papers.  One of the most common tasks of the questioned document examiner is to determine if a suspect document is an original.  Often tests are done by comparison with other original samples or by comparison with standard reference materials.  Questioned document examiners work with samples that range from historical treatises to currency to identification papers such as passports.

Many types of tests can be performed by the questioned document examiner.  These range from simple imaging to advanced spectroscopic analysis.  Due to the microscopic nature of many of the unique features in documents, microprinting being just one example, microspectrophotometers such as the 20/30 PV™ and the CRAIC Apollo™ Raman are utilized.  These systems are able to provide images and spectra of microscopic features of questioned documents by UV-visible-NIR reflectance, transmission, fluorescence and Raman excitation. The visible part of the spectrum is important as it helps distinguish between different colored inks, papers and security features.  The UV is important as many of the chemicals used in inks and papers have a UV active component.  Additionally, many security features are only detectable in the ultraviolet region.  The NIR region is important as some of the newer security features have spectral responses here.  

To learn more about microspectroscopy and applications such as questioned document examination, select one of the following links: 

What is a Microspectrophotometer?

Science of Microspectrophotometers

Ink and Paper of Questioned Documents

20/30 PV™ Microspectrophotometers

UVM-1™ UV-Visible-NIR Microscope

CRAIC Apollo™ Raman Microspectrometer

 

Biomaterials Research

Biomaterials development with a microspectrophotometer

 

 

Film thickness with a microspectrophotometer

Film thickness measurements of materials

 

 

Microspectrophotometers are used to analyze biomaterials by imaging and spectroscopy.

Nanotechnology is the control of matter on the atomic or molecular scale.  It has many different applications including research of biomaterials.  Biomaterials are naturally occuring materials or those derived from biological processes. They have unique properties arising from features that occur on the micro or nano-scale.  Examples include silicates in algae and proteins. 

Due to the microscopic scales of the materials to be analyzed, microspectrophotometers are the perfect tool.  Able to analyze micro-scale samples by absorption, reflectance or even fluorescence, these tools are easy-to-use and very accurate.  Their flexibility and accuracy make them very important for analyzing everything from the optical effects of butterfly wings to protein crystals. 

To learn more about microspectroscopy and biomaterial research applications, select one of the following links: 

What is a Microspectrophotometer?

Science of Microspectrophotometers

Microspectrophotometer Design

Uses of Microspectrophotometers

20/30 PV™ Microspectrophotometers

 UV-visible-NIR microscopes, UV-visible-NIR microspectrometers and Raman microspectrometers are general purpose laboratory instruments. They have not been cleared or approved by the European IVD Directive, the United States Food and Drug Administration or any other agency for diagnostic, clinical or other medical use.