Near Infrared Microscopy

Near Infrared microscopy

Near Infrared Microscopy is microscopy for imaging in the near infrared region. 

Near infrared microscopes are designed to "see" beyond what a standard optical microscope can image.  With special NIR optics, light sources and cameras, near infrared microscopy is for imaging microscopic samples in the visible and the Near infrared region.  This means that near infrared microscopes have features that make them superior to normal visible range microscopes:

  • Some materials are transparent in the Near Infrared while being opaque in the visible region
  • Enhanced contrast of certain materials in the Near Infrared region. 

For example, silicon is opaque under normal light but is transparent in the NIR region.  The interiors of silicon based devices can therefore be inspected without having to disassemble them.    

CRAIC Technologies offers a number of solutions for the near infrared microscope.  These custom designed microscopes capable of imaging from the visible region all the way into the near infrared.  They are capable of microscopy in transmission, reflectance and even fluorescence.

Learn more about Near Infrared microscopy:

Near Infrared Microscope Design

Uses of the Near Infrared Microscope

UVM-1™ Near Infrared Microscope

 
 
The lit microscope base is a trademark of CRAIC Technologies, Inc.
 

 

 

Near IR Microscopy

Near IR microscopy

Near IR Microscopy is microscopy for imaging in the near infrared region. 

Near IR microscopes are designed to "see" beyond what a standard optical microscope can image.  With special NIR optics, light sources and cameras, Near IR microscopy is for imaging microscopic samples in the visible and the Near IR region.  This means that Near IR microscopes have features that make them superior to normal visible range microscopes:

  • Some materials are transparent in the Near IR while being opaque in the visible region
  • Enhanced contrast of certain materials in the Near IR region. 

For example, silicon is opaque under normal light but is transparent in the NIR region.  The interior of silicon based devices can therefore be inspected without having to disassemble them.    

CRAIC Technologies offers a number of solutions for the Near IR microscope.  These custom designed microscopes capable of imaging from the visible region all the way into the Near IR.  They are capable of microscopy in transmission, reflectance and even fluorescence.

Learn more about Near IR microscopy:

Near IR Microscope Design

Uses of the Near IR Microscope

UVM-1™ Near IR Microscope

 
 
The lit microscope base is a trademark of CRAIC Technologies, Inc.
 

Micro Total Analysis Systems Analysis

Micro Total Analysis Systems analysis with a microspectrophotometer

Microspectrophotometers are used to analyze Micro total analysis system test points by reflectance, absorbance and fluorescence


 

Micro Total Analysis System analysis with a microspectrophotometer

Typical test spectra

 

 

Micro total analysis systems devices, sometimes called lab-on-a-chip devices, are designed to replicate a series of full-scale chemical and biological reactions on a single micro-scale device.  They are sometimes called microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) for their fluid handling capabilities on the microscopic scale. As such, a single device is used to replicate a series of chemical reactions but on a microscopic scale.  Therefore analytical techniques are required that can measure whether reactions have reached a successful conclusion but of micro-scale volumes.

Due to the microscopic volumes of the materials to be analyzed, microspectrophotometers are the perfect tool.  Able to analyze micro-scale volumes by absorption, reflectance or even fluorescence, these tools are easy-to-use and very accurate.  Their flexibility and accuracy make them very importance when developing or using custom micro total analysis systems. 

To learn more about microspectroscopy and Micro Total Analysis Systems development and testing, select one of the following links: 

What is a Microspectrophotometer?

Science of Microspectrophotometers

Microspectrophotometer Design

Uses of Microspectrophotometers

20/30 PV™ Microspectrophotometers

CRAIC Apollo™ Raman Microspectrometer

 

 

LCD Metrology

LCD or liquid crystal display

Microspectrophotometers are used to test the color and intensity of each LCD pixel


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LCD or liquid crystal display

Typical test spectra from a liquid crystal display

 

 

LCD Metrology: Color, relative intensity, spectroscopy and film thickness of pixels and light sources.

Liquid Crystal Display, or LCD, is a device that consist of a light source covered by a series of colored "pxels" arranged in a pattern on a color mask.  A liquid crystal layer is controlled with electronics and acts as a shutter for each pixel.  These can be turned on and off rapidly and thus are commonly used for high resolution displays.  As these pixels are getting smaller and smaller, especially with the latest generation of microdisplays, color consistency and intensity are presenting ever difficult quality control challenges. 

Due to the nature of flat panel displays, they are manufactured with hundreds of rows of microscopic pixels to be deposited on a surface.  In the next generation of microdisplay, such as those used in MP3 players and mobile phones, these pixels can be as small as 10 microns across.  Quality control of both the components and completed LCD devices is done by optical microspectroscopy.  Microspectrometers, such as those made by CRAIC Technologies, are used to measure the color and the intensity of the output from individual pixels and from groups of pixels.  They are can be used to map the color and intensity outputs of individual pixels or even entire displays.  This is important as manufacturers of flat panel displays need to make sure that all the different types of pixels are the same color and brightness.  A microspectrophotometer does this quickly and easily.  

Learn about microscale LCD testing and analysis: 

What is a Microspectrophotometer?

Science of Microspectrophotometers

Colorimetry of Pixels and Displays

Relative Intensity Measurements

 

 

LED Metrology

LED or light emitting diode

Microspectrophotometers are used to test the color and intensity of each LED pixel and light source


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LED or light emitting diode

Typical test spectra from different LEDs.

 

 

Microspectrometers are used for measuring the spectra, color and intensity of even the smallest LEDs.

Light emitting diodes, or LEDs, utilize molecular compounds to emit light.  The basic LED is made of an a cathode, an emissive layer, a conductive layer, a substrate and an anode.  Placing a charge across the layers causes the emission of photons from the emissive layer.  Different types of atoms and molecules and different manufacturing processes result in various colors and display designs. 

Due to the nature of light emitting diode devices, they can be manufactured by processes that cause rows of microscopic LEDs to be deposited on a surface.  Such designs have led to the common use of LED devices as displays and light sources.  They generate little waste heat and can yield a significant energy savings.

Development testing and quality control of both the components and completed LED devices is done by optical microspectroscopy.  Microspectrometers, such as those made by CRAIC Technologies, are used to measure the spectra and the intensity of the output from individual devices and from groups of devices.  They are even used to map the color and intensity outputs of entire displays.  This is important as manufacturers of light emitting diodes need to make sure that all the different types of devices are the same color and brightness.  A microspectrophotometer does this quickly and easily.  

Learn about microscale LED analysis and testing:

What is a Microspectrophotometer?

Science of Microspectrophotometers

Microspectrophotometer Design

Uses of Microspectrophotometers

20/30 PV™ Microspectrophotometers