The Basics of UV-Visible-NIR Microspectrophotometry

UV-Visible-NIR microspectrophotometry is a non-destructive method used to measure the spectra of microscopic samples or microscopic areas. Depending on the setup, a microspectrophotometer may obtain a wide range of signal types from sample areas, including absorbance, fluorescence, polarization, reflectance and transmittance. 

This post covers the basics of UV-Visible-NIR microspectrophotometry, including how the microspectrophotometer works.

What is UV-Visible-NIR Microspectrophotometry?

UV-Visible-NIR microspectrophotometry is used to analyze and measure the optical properties of microscopic samples without damaging or even coming into contact with the sample’s surface. It is a crucial method that eclipses both conventional microscopy and photometry, with an array of practical uses. Common applications of UV-Visible-NIR microspectrophotometry include thin film thickness measurements and color space determination.

UV-Visible-NIR Microspectrophotometers

UV-Visible-NIR microspectrophotometers are flexible instruments that are used in a range of research and industry fields, including art, geology, materials science, pharmaceuticals and more. They are built by combining a microscope's excellent magnification capabilities and a spectrophotometer's spectral analysis to measure spectra on a microscopic scale. Samples can be viewed with high-resolution imaging from deep ultraviolet (UV) through to the near-infrared (NIR).
Microspectrophotometers can often be enhanced to be more effective by optimizing optics and light sources–processes that involve changing the source of light and the imaging systems. 

How Does A UV-Visible-NIR Microspectrophotometer Work?

A UV-Visible-NIR Microspectrophotometer is used to measure the spectra of microscopic samples. Sometimes, a microspectrophotometer will be added to a standard microscope, but others are fully integrated instruments.
When measuring the spectra, the microspectrophotometer will work in the following ways:

  • The microscope has a lamp that will emit white light. This light is directed onto the sample being tested.
  • Some of the light will be absorbed by the sample, but the quantity will depend on the chemical composition and the environment.
  • Any light that has not been absorbed will be obtained by the microspectrophotometer’s objective and directed into the aperture.
  • The aperture provides a mirror effect, and as a result, most of the light is reflected into a digital imaging system. This allows the user to align the aperture and the system for optimal spectral acquisition.
  • Any light that does not reach the digital imaging system will be directed through the aperture and into the spectrophotometer to be measured by a charge coupled device (CCD) or CCD detector.
  • The light captured by the CCD detector is analyzed and stored as an optical spectrum. This is then mapped out as an XY chart that displays the intensity of each wavelength. 

CRAIC Technologies

CRAIC Technologies™ manufactures a range of microspectrophotometers for a number of applications, as well as imaging microphotometers, UV-Visible-NIR microscopes, Raman microspectrometers and more. Below we will outline our most sophisticated product.

2030PV PRO™ microspectrophotometer

The most powerful micro-analysis instrument that CRAIC Technologies™ manufactures is the cutting-edge 2030PV PRO™ microspectrophotometer. It can be built to your requirements and uses the latest technology in electrics, optics, software and spectroscopy to provide outstanding performance and unique analyzing capabilities.

The 2030PV PRO™ is easy to use and the system includes a range of features such as automation, instruments ergonomics and software. In addition to the above, it is worth noting that CRAIC Technologies™ is the only certified company for NIST traceable microspectrometer standards.

If you are interested in learning more about our products or would like to make a purchase, please don’t hesitate to contact us today!