Carbon Nanotubes

CNT analysis by microspectroscopy

Microspectrophotometers are used to analyze carbon nanotubes and CNT based devices

 

Carbon Nanotube CNT

 

Carbon nanotube analysis by microspectroscopy

Typical test spectra of a carbon sheet

 

 

Carbon nanotubes and their optical effects are studied with a microspectrophotometer.

The carbon nanotube (CNT) is carbon with a cylindrical nanostructure. Carbon nanotubes are long, hollow structures with the walls formed by one-atom-thick sheets of graphene - a two dimensional form of carbon. These sheets are rolled under specific conditions and the combination of the rolling angle and radius decides the nanotube properties.  Additionally, carbon nanotubes naturally align themselves into "ropes" held together by van der Waals forces. CNT molecules have unique properties, which may be useful for for optics, electronics, nanotechnology and material science.

Mapping the spectral characteristics of CNT and CNT bundles with microscopic spatial resolution can easily be done with microspectrophotometers.  Microspectrophotometers are also useful when only microscopic amounts of CNT materials are available for analysis.   And because CNT has many novel optical, electronic and phsyical properties, it will see use in new electronic devices such as those well suited for analysis with microspectrophotometers.  With such devices, microspectrophotometers can give information about the thickness of thin films of carbon nanotubes, their optical and electronic attributes, as well as the vibration level characteristics using Raman microspectroscopy.   

To learn more about microspectroscopy and carbon nanotubes analysis and testing, select one of the following links: 

What is a Microspectrophotometer?

Science of Microspectrophotometers

Microspectrophotometer Design

Uses of Microspectrophotometers

20/30 PV™ Microspectrophotometers

 

 UV-visible-NIR microscopes, UV-visible-NIR microspectrometers and Raman microspectrometers are general purpose laboratory instruments. They have not been cleared or approved by the European IVD Directive, the United States Food and Drug Administration or any other agency for diagnostic, clinical or other medical use.

Graphene Characterization with Microscale UV-VIS and Raman!

As CRAIC Technologies specializes in optical tools for spectroscopic characterization from the ultraviolet to the short-wave infrared with microscale sampling areas, there are a multitude of applications for both our microspectrophotometers (MSP) and Raman microspectrometers in the study of low dimension materials and devices. This is especially true as they can both be used on the same microscope to quickly and easily collect Transmission, Reflection, or Photoluminescence microspectra from the same area as Raman microspectra, and these spectra can be mapped over 2-dimensional areas of the sample or device!

A microspectrophotometer can be used to measure the  number of layers present with microscale sampling areas ranging from 1x1 micron up to 100x100 microns.  Pristine graphene absorbs 2.29% per layer in the visible wavelengths, so the thickness of the sample at that position can be easily determined with  just the transmission intensity.

Transmission of GrapheneRaman of Graphene


In graphene (or other carbon based low dimension materials), there are three characteristic peaks that are typically observed in the Raman spectra, referred to as the D-peak at 1360 cm-1, the G-peak at 1600 cm-1, and the 2D peak at 2700 cm-1.  The exact frequency of these vibrations will be influenced by the local environment, such as substrate, solvents, and localized defects, which is a major reason why Raman is such a great analysis tool.

The G-peak is due to the carbon-carbon bond stretching, while the D-peak is indicative of disorder or impurities in the Graphene sample.  The 2D peak is common to all Graphite samples, and the intensity, width, and location of this peak can be used in order to determine the number of layers of the sample.  The presence of the D peak in this spectrum indicates disorder in the sample, and the intensity of this peak can be used to measure the disorder in the sample. 

To learn more about applications of CRAIC instruments to Graphene and other low-dimension materials, please reach out to us by phone or email!

Contact CRAIC Today!

UV-visible-NIR microscopes, UV-visible-NIR microspectrometers and Raman microspectrometers are general purpose laboratory instruments. They have not been cleared or approved by the European IVD Directive, the United States Food and Drug Administration or any other agency for diagnostic, clinical or other medical use.

Learn about spectrophotometry and how spectral microscopy measures UV-visible-NIR

Spectral Microscope

Spectral Microscopy data

Emission Spectra Measured with a Spectral Microscope

Spectral Microscopy is used to measure the spectra of microscopic samples.

Spectral Microscopy uses an instrument designed to measure UV-visible-NIR and Raman spectra of microscopic samples or microscopic areas of larger objects.  There are two basic types: the fully integrated microspectrophotometer (as shown) that has been built and optimized for microspectrophotometry.  There is also the spectrophotometer designed to attach to an open photoport of an optical microscope.   Each has its strengths and depending upon the configuration, both are capable of measuring the spectra of microscopic samples by transmission, absorbance, reflectance, fluorescence, emission, Raman and polarization spectrophotometry.   With special software, both are capable of thin film thickness measurements and micro-colorimetry as well.

A CRAIC Technologies™ spectral microscope is a purpose-built system that allows UV-visible-NIR range micro spectrophotometry both non-destructively and with no sample contact.  Capable of analyzing even sub-micron areas, they are also capable of high resolution digital imaging.  Designed for ease-of-use, they are durable instruments designed for spectral microscopy.

Contact CRAIC Today!

To learn more about the spectral microscope, select a link:

What is a spectral microscope?

Science of spectral microscopy

Spectral Microscope Design

Uses of the Spectral Microscope

508 PV™ Microscope Spectrophotometers

20/30 PV™ Microspectrophotometer

CRAIC Apollo™ Raman Microspectrometer

 

We invite you to discover our revolutionary technologies that include a range of spectral microscopes, UV-visible-NIR microscopes, Raman microspectrometers, Traceable Standards, spectral microscopy accessories and software. We further invite you to experience our exceptional service and technical support.

 

 

Spectral Microscope

Spectral Microscope

 

 

Spectral Microscopy data

Emission Spectra Measured with a Spectral Microscope

 

 

A spectral microscope is used to measure the spectra of microscopic samples.

The spectral microscope is an instrument designed to measure UV-visible-NIR and Raman spectra of microscopic samples or microscopic areas of larger objects.  There are two basic types: the fully integrated microspectrophotometer (as shown) that has been built and optimized for microspectrophotometry.  There is also the spectrophotometer designed to attach to an open photoport of an optical microscope.   Each has its strengths and depending upon the configuration, both are capable of measuring the spectra of microscopic samples by transmission, absorbance, reflectance, fluorescence, emission, Raman and polarization spectrophotometry.   With special software, both are capable of thin film thickness measurements and micro-colorimetry as well.

A CRAIC Technologies™ spectral microscope is a purpose-built system that allows UV-visible-NIR range micro spectrophotometry both non-destructively and with no sample contact.  Capable of analyzing even sub-micron areas, they are also capable of high resolution digital imaging.  Designed for ease-of-use, they are durable instruments designed for spectral microscopy.

Contact CRAIC Today!

To learn more about the spectral microscope, select a link:

What is a Spectral Microscope?

Science of Spectral Microscopy

Spectral Microscope Design

Uses of the Spectral Microscope

508 PV™ Microscope Spectrophotometers

20/30 PV™ Microspectrophotometer

CRAIC Apollo™ Raman Microspectrometer

 

We invite you to discover our revolutionary technologies that include a range of spectral microscopes, UV-visible-NIR microscopes, Raman microspectrometers, Traceable Standards, spectral microscopy accessories and software. We further invite you to experience our exceptional service and technical support.

 

 

Colloidal Materials Research

Colloid development can be done with a microspectrophotometer

 

 

Colloidal Science can be done with microspectrophotometers

Microscopic Materials Science Spectroscopy

 

 

Microspectrophotometers are used to analyze colloids and colloidal materials by imaging and spectroscopy

A colloid is a substance that is evenly dispersed on the microscopic scale throughout another substance.  Colloidal substances have many different applications ranging from pharmaceuticals to Raman spectral enhancement materials.  Colloids can either be naturally derived or created by such processes as high shear techniques.  Due to their unique nature, they have many useful and interesting properties. 

Due to the microscopic scales of colloids and colloidal solutions, microspectrophotometers are the perfect tool.  Able to analyze micro-scale samples by absorbance, reflectance or even fluorescence, these tools are easy-to-use and very accurate.  Their flexibility and accuracy make them very importance for analyzing everything from the optical effects of butterfly wings to protein crystals. 

To learn more about microspectroscopy and colloid and colloidal research applications, select one of the following links: 

What is a Microspectrophotometer?

Science of Microspectrophotometers

Microspectrophotometer Design

Uses of Microspectrophotometers

20/30 PV™ Microspectrophotometers

 

 UV-visible-NIR microscopes, UV-visible-NIR microspectrometers and Raman microspectrometers are general purpose laboratory instruments. They have not been cleared or approved by the European IVD Directive, the United States Food and Drug Administration or any other agency for diagnostic, clinical or other medical use.